TakaraSay
TakaraSay
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joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
joodle:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places
Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.
Source: Fast Co-Design
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flyngdream:

Morten Rustad - Norway: A Timelapse Adventure | gif by FD
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wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
wtftheride:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I want to go here.
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magictransistor:

Ilya Repin, Sadko in the Underwater Kingdom (Oil on canvas), 1876.
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preschooler:

Is this not me?
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asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
asylum-art:

Invisible Statues by Rob Mulholland

Scottish sculptor has created a ghostly art installation in the woodland walk at the David Marshall Lodge in Scotland titled Vestige. Originally intended to be temporary, the six mirrored life-size silhouettes (three men and three women) have been so popular that they are now to become a permanent fixture in the previously inhabited woodlands. Mulholland’s idea behind the installation seems twofold:  to create a vestige of the people who once occupied the land until following World War I, when they were re-located while forests were planted to generate timber and; to make people ‘reflect’ upon man’s impact on the nature.
The almost imperceptible sculptures camouflaged by their surroundings have an eerie quality that has been compared by many to the predator in the 1980s film of the same name that seamlessly blends into its surrounding
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dustypast:

comparing my cat with magic creation on the hand of my mate @dasetattoo  awesome!))
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